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Association Events

On Saturday 10 November 2018, the Lord Mayors Show took place through the City of London.  The show has an incredible history dating back to 1215. 

A brief history taken from the Lord Mayors Show Website (https://lordmayorsshow.london) can be found below.

This year the show had 148 floats of various shapes and sizes celebrating Londons companies, organisations and volunteers.  As you can imagine organisation of such an event is planned meticulously ans timings are exact to the second.  Assisting in the smooth running of such a huge event is an army of Military personnel, both Regular and Reserve, Serving and Retired.  Wearing Military uniform and the red armband of an official show marshal, they are assigned into small sections in order to work in teams to 'look after' sections of the parade.  This is to offer assistance, guidance and support to the participants, as well as offer a level of control to both the security and timings of the event. 

The picture shows four QARANC serving Officers about to start their Marshalling duties following a 0600hrs breakfast briefing at the Haberdashers Hall in London.

Left to Right

Major Alex Saunders, 10th year as a Marshal and presently posted to Medical Branch, Regional Command in Aldershot.

Major Andy Stubbs, 6th year as a Marshal and presently posted to 306 Hospital Support Regiment.

Major Ali Price, 8th year as a Marshal and presently posted to MOSG as SO2 Med Plans and is specialising in patient evacuation.

Lt George Chapman, 1st year as a Marshal and presently posted to 254 Medical Regiment.

History

The new Mayor of London was supposed to stand by King John as his Barons rebelled and the country drifted into civil war, but London’s rich European merchants had other ideas.

In 1215 King John’s disastrous reign was falling apart. His armies were retreating in France, he was completely broke and his Barons were on the edge of open revolt. Soon he would be forced to sign the Magna Carta, which he would go on ignoring until civil war finally broke out and he died of dysentery while marching from one besieged city to another.

London is right in the middle of the coming conflict. It is rich but vulnerable, hard to rule but easy to invade. The city is squeezed by the King’s taxes and frequently held hostage by warring Barons, and this is very bad for business.  For years London had been trying to organise itself into a ‘commune’: a sort of early city state that would be able to declare its borders, make agreements and defend itself. The King may have thought it was a clever move to go along with this, and in 1215 he issued a Royal Charter creating the commune and allowing the City to elect its own Mayor every year.

The King added a condition: every year the newly elected Mayor must leave the safety of the City, travel upriver to the small town of Westminster and swear loyalty to him. The Lord Mayor has now made that journey for over 800 years, despite plagues and fires and countless wars, and pledged his (and her) loyalty to 34 kings and queens of England.

In fact the loyalty of 13th century London was quite flexible, and when it sided with a group of rebellious barons, the King was finally brought to the negotiating table. From this came the Magna Carta and the birth of modern Britain. Among its 25 signatories was the second elected Mayor of London, William Hardel, no doubt responsible for the inclusion of part 13:

13. The city of London shall enjoy all its ancient liberties and free customs, both by land and by water. We also will and grant that all other cities, boroughs, towns, and ports shall enjoy all their liberties and free customs.

The Mayor became the “Lord Mayor” about a century later but it remained an elected office and for the next few hundred years, Lord Mayor of London was by far the grandest position to which a commoner could aspire.

The Mayor’s journey was the celebrity spectacle of its day and over the centuries it grew so splendid and so popular that by the 16th century it was known everywhere as the Lord Mayor’s Show. It features in the plays of Shakespeare, the diaries of Peyps and the adventures of James Bond and of course in the pantomime story of Dick Whittington, who really was the Mayor of London three times. In the 20th century the Lord Mayor’s Show was the first outside event ever to be broadcast live and it still attracts a TV audience of millions.

The modern Lord Mayor's procession is a direct descendant of that first journey to Westminster. The route and date have changed over the years, but the pageantry of Hogarth and Canaletto can still be seen in its lively mixture of London’s past, present and future. The state coach is over 250 years old, and the pikemen who guard it are almost as old as the Show. Today you will see the City’s businesses, Livery Companies, charities, Her Majesty’s Forces, the City Police and Londoners from all walks of life come together to enjoy a splendid celebration of the City’s ancient power and prosperity, just as they did in the middle ages. 

Our Association members are invited to apply for The Not Forgotten Association Christmas Luncheons with Entertainment taking place in December. 

Kirknewton, Edinburgh on 10th December 

Durham on 11th December

Broughton, Lancashire on 12th December

Wrexham on 13th December

Bransford, Worcester on 14th December

 

Please contact RHQ clicking 'EMAIL US'  or 01276 412754 to apply.  We have been offered 4 spaces for each event, tickets will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

Col Jane Carey Harris arranged a most splendid outing to the Cutler's Company at their Hall in the City of London.  The Cutlers are one of the most ancient livery companies in the city having received their Royal Charter in 1416 from King Henry V and made the swords for the Battle of Agincourt.
 
We were greeted by a The Beadle & were offered a most welcome cuppa before our tour started. We were told about the history of the Company & the importance of the cutting tool. We were also given the history of their hall which has been rebuilt several times. It is a truly beautiful building. All those involved with the tour were obviously proud of their heritage & made it most interesting.
We were then taken into the Court Room & told the story about the Rose water ritual & the passing of the Loving Cup. We enacted this which was followed by the passing of the Madeira decanter & our "Acting Master" Major Karen Ives proposing the toasts. We all then sang the National Anthem.
 
After our fascinating tour we were treated to a wonderful lunch preceded by a glass of Champagne. The menu that Col Jane had chosen was delicious & enjoyed by all. Of course, there was fine wine to accompany the meal which was followed by coffee & mints. We were delighted that friends of members & several of our honorary members together with a member from the Welsh Branch & members of the City Volunteers Officers Club were able to join us.
 
This years outing will be remembered as one of our most successful. It was enjoyed by all, not only for what we learnt, but because of the enthusiasm of those who proudly told us about their livery company.

Fields of Mud, Seeds of Hope is a unique sculptural piece commemorating the sacrifices made by the generation who served during the Great War and the legacies the conflict created.  Composed using battlefield mud from Passchendaele and earth taken from a Great War military camp in the U.K the work starts thoroughly soaked. As the wet mud dries and cracks the five battle weary silhouettes gradually appear, trudging home their backs to the past and facing the future.

Deep within the mud millions of ungerminated poppy seeds lay dormant. 

When decommissioned segments of the sculpture comprising of the dried earth and seeds will be made available to the public to create their own artworks or memorial gardens, therefore allowing the legacy of the work to continue in another form indefinitely. This is an artwork which is as much about those who returned home from the Great War as it is about those who didn’t. 

Fields of Mud, Seeds of Hope will be on display in Ripon Cathedral from 3rd October to 14th November. 

Admission to the exhibit is free, to the Cathedral by voluntary donation and can be viewed 7 days a week from 9:30-17:00.

Two members of Millbank Branch, QARANC Association, on the 1st Sep 18 were privileged to attend a Drumhead Service at The Royal Hospital Chelsea to commemorate the London Divisions actions during the final 100 days of WW1.The service was lead by the The Right Honourable Reverend Lord Chartres.
 
The Lord Lieutenant of London & many other dignitaries together with other guests were welcomed by the women of the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY). Among the guests were the family of Pte Jack Harvey VC. He was awarded the VC for single handedly putting a machine gun post and its crew, out of action. As always the The Chelsea Pensioners resplendent in their scarlet coats were in attendance.
 
Following a moving & fitting service which included some songs from the The North London Military Wives Choir, the guests were invited to the hospitality marquee where they we saw interactive stands & displays & arena events by Youth Organisations in Uniform (YOU).
 
It was an honour to attend  such a memorable occasion.
 
Janette Parkin
Millbank Branch

STEP SHORT PARADE 22 July 2018

With France visible across the Strait of Dover, Folkestone became an important transit point in WW1 for soldiers including nurses leaving for the battlefields of the Western Front.  From August 2014 until the end of the war approximately 10 million men passed through the port to France including others who were returning on leave or who were wounded requiring hospital treatment.

Embarkation was from the Leas, the cliffs above the harbour, and men marched down a steep hill to the boats that would take them to France. The word of command given to the marching men was, ‘step short’ and so today we honour all those who fought and gave their lives in WW1 at the Step Short Parade at the War Memorial Arch situated on the Leas directly above the harbour.  Col Jane Carey-Harris, Majors Adele Rutledge, Christine Duchemin, Liz Gregory and Major Gwin Foley as standard bearer, paraded for Millbank Branch of the Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps Association.  We were proud to join approximately 200 others on parade from military Associations including between 20-30 standards being proudly carried.

2018 marks a special milestone in our commemoration of all those who were involved in WW1 but particularly those who marched down the hill now known as the Road of Remembrance to Folkestone Harbour and the and battlefields beyond.

GEF 22 Jul 18

The QARANC Association will fully fund a PhD Scholar from within the Association membership to undertake PhD studies at the University of Cardiff commencing October 2019 (or sooner if it suits the person accepted).

The Association has a particular interest in the heritage of the Corps with one of the Objects of the Association being, “Fostering esprit de corps, comradeship and the welfare of the corps and preserving its traditions .", something that is also made clear in the establishment, and the Terms of Reference, of the Heritage and Chattels Committee.

Although much has been written about the history of Army nursing, and many scholars continue to research and write our history, there is a lack of authoritative writing from the perspective of Army nurses themselves. It has been difficult for Army nurses, serving or retired, to gain the necessary skills and standing to be able to write history that is acceptable in academic and scholarly contexts. There are members of the Association who would like the opportunity to gain these skills at Doctoral level, in order to advance the body of knowledge from within Army nursing.

SCHOLARSHIP

The QARANC Association will fully fund a PhD Scholar from within the Association membership to undertake PhD studies at the University of Cardiff commencing October 2019 (or sooner if it suits the person accepted). The main supervisor will be Professor Holly Furneaux of the School of English, Communication and Philosophy, University of Cardiff.

For more information on the Scholarship including how to apply download the attached document below

On Saturday 7th July Millbank Branch held their AGM at the HQ of 256 (City of London) Field Hospital.
20 members attended. Some members were unable to attend at the last minute due to transport issues. Those who did make it battled with folks going to the Pride March & others making their way to the Finsbury Park Festival. If that was not enough they had to contend with the heat! We were melting.
The meeting went well which was then followed by an interesting & enlightening talk from Lt Col Tony McGrath QARANC 2iC of 256 about where they are now & where they will be in the future in the scheme of things.
Members were most impressed with his presentation.
This was follow by a sumptuous afternoon tea & a glass of Prosecco.
 
We have set the date for next year's AGM so that it does not clash with Wimbledon's finals
Millbank Branch attended The Old Comrades Association Parade - 3rd June 2018

It was another glorious day of sunshine for the Federation of OCAs of London territorial and auxiliary units.  I paraded the Millbank standard  supported by Maj Gwin Foley & Capt Jane Parker.

There were 11 standard bearers and a good show from the old comrades. Wreaths were laid at the Royal Exchange and the march proceeded through the City of London to the Armoury House on City Road.  Due to the very hot weather, the inspection was kept brief.  The RAF chaplain talked about love and how wasteful war is through the poems of William Auden and Rupert Brook. Lunch was a delightful summer salad and cheesecake.  The guest speaker talked about the loneliness many veterans experience in older age - very poignant and touching. 1 in 4 veterans aged over 75 live alone. 
He asked us all to keep in contact and look out for each other in the spirit of friendship. ‘

Capt Alison Browne

One of our Colonels Commandant Jane Davis OBE QVRM TD DL RGN has been appointed as the Vice Lord-Lieutenant for Greater London, Jane has been a Deputy Lieutenant since 2008.  The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British Monarch’s personal representatives throughout the United Kingdom, usually in a county or large city (metropolitan area). They have performed various tasks throughout history including raising local militia units and numerous ceremonial duties.

Lord-Lieutenants may appoint a Vice Lord-Lieutenant and the nomination is submitted to the Prime Minister in order that the approval of The Monarch may be obtained. The Vice Lord-Lieutenant will stand in when the Lord-Lieutenant cannot be present, is sick or otherwise unable to act, and will carry out such duties as the Lord-Lieutenant decides.  The Greater London Lieutenancy as well as supporting the Monarch and the Royal Family in Greater London, is a bridge-builder, connecting individuals, organisations and social networks, to enhance Londoners’ sense of belonging and therefore, increase social inclusion within the capital.

Congratulations

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A Career in Army Nursing

ABTB

The QARANC employs Officers and Soldiers in both the Regular and Reserve Army, as Registered Nurses, Student Nurses, and Health Care Assistants, and we are always looking for people. If you are interested in a career as a Nurse or Health Care Assistant which also offers other great opportunities then you are just the person we are looking for. A career in the QARANC is more than a job, you will have access to extensive training and development opportunities, not just related to your job, but personal development too. You will have the opportunity to use your skills in diverse settings – wherever the Army is employed health care professionals from the QARANC are there. Right now there are QARANC personnel working around the world, including Sierra Leone, Canada, Mali, Afghanistan, Germany, and Cyprus. Being in the QARANC you will have access to, and be expected to undertake adventurous training, and you will have access to free medical and dental care, as well as robust annual leave and pension package. For information contact a member of the QARANC recruiting team on: 01276 412741, 01276 412742 or 01276 412740 or visit

www.armyjobs.mod.uk

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